Hasid Hasid

Ask me anything   Submit   Inside every cynical person, there is a disappointed idealist.

twitter.com/_VME:

    saunteringvaguelydownwards:

    decemberpaladin:

    sizvideos:

    Video

    I love how she almost drops it until she smells it and that flashbulb memory hits.

    “Real isn’t how you are made,” said the Skin Horse. “It’s a thing that happens to you. When a child loves you for a long, long time, not just to play with, but REALLY loves you, then you become Real … Generally, by the time you are Real, most of your hair has been loved off, and your eyes drop out and you get loose in the joints and very shabby. But these things don’t matter at all, because once you are Real you can’t be ugly, except to people who don’t understand.”

    Margery Williams, The Velveteen Rabbit

    (via mybodymyblog)

    — 2 days ago with 169426 notes
    vs-angelwings:

Irina Shayk in XTI's Spring 2014 Ad

    vs-angelwings:

    Irina Shayk in XTI's Spring 2014 Ad

    — 2 days ago with 520 notes
    earthstory:

This is not a Photoshop or LED trick! 
This is Vaadhoo Island in Maldives; welcome to the world of Bioluminescence!The biologically illuminated waves are due to the presence of light emitting phytoplankton. Bioluminescence results from energy released during chemical reactions occurring inside the organism. A very small fraction of the released energy is heat.Most of the Pelagic Organisms (living in Open Ocean) exhibit this phenomenon. Since the Sun’s rays are not able to penetrate deep enough in sea water, sea creatures living in the realm of darkness (beyond 300m) have evolved to produce their own light.Most of these organisms emit blue light. This is because it has a shorter wavelength, and thus has higher energy to travel farther through the sea water. An exception to this is Loosejaw which emits red light. Red light, having a longer wavelength, cannot travel long enough so this helps Loosejaws to remain invisible for the predators.Bioluminescence serves different purposes for different organisms. It can be:• To communicate• To illuminate prey• To attract mates• Camouflage-TT(Photo Source: Doug Perrine, Alamyhttp://news.nationalgeographic.com/news/2012/03/pictures/120319-glowing-waves-ocean-blue-bioluminescent-plankton-scienceArticle References: 1. National Geographic - http://news.nationalgeographic.com/news/2012/03/pictures/120319-glowing-waves-ocean-blue-bioluminescent-plankton-science2. http://www.lifesci.ucsb.edu/~biolum/3. http://www.waltonoutdoors.com/bioluminescent-waves-light-up-the-shoreline-at-grayton-beach/For further study: 1. NOAA - http://oceanservice.noaa.gov/facts/biolum.htmlhttp://oceanexplorer.noaa.gov/explorations/09bioluminescence/welcome.htmlhttp://www.noaa.gov/features/02_monitoring/bioluminescence.html 2. How Stuffs Work - http://science.howstuffworks.com/environmental/life/zoology/all-about-animals/bioluminescence1.htm)

    earthstory:

    This is not a Photoshop or LED trick! 


    This is Vaadhoo Island in Maldives; welcome to the world of Bioluminescence!

    The biologically illuminated waves are due to the presence of light emitting phytoplankton. Bioluminescence results from energy released during chemical reactions occurring inside the organism. A very small fraction of the released energy is heat.

    Most of the Pelagic Organisms (living in Open Ocean) exhibit this phenomenon. Since the Sun’s rays are not able to penetrate deep enough in sea water, sea creatures living in the realm of darkness (beyond 300m) have evolved to produce their own light.

    Most of these organisms emit blue light. This is because it has a shorter wavelength, and thus has higher energy to travel farther through the sea water. An exception to this is Loosejaw which emits red light. Red light, having a longer wavelength, cannot travel long enough so this helps Loosejaws to remain invisible for the predators.

    Bioluminescence serves different purposes for different organisms. It can be:
    • To communicate
    • To illuminate prey
    • To attract mates
    • Camouflage

    -TT

    (Photo Source: Doug Perrine, Alamy
    http://news.nationalgeographic.com/news/2012/03/pictures/120319-glowing-waves-ocean-blue-bioluminescent-plankton-science

    Article References: 
    1. National Geographic - http://news.nationalgeographic.com/news/2012/03/pictures/120319-glowing-waves-ocean-blue-bioluminescent-plankton-science

    2. http://www.lifesci.ucsb.edu/~biolum/

    3. http://www.waltonoutdoors.com/bioluminescent-waves-light-up-the-shoreline-at-grayton-beach/

    For further study: 
    1. NOAA - http://oceanservice.noaa.gov/facts/biolum.html
    http://oceanexplorer.noaa.gov/explorations/09bioluminescence/welcome.html
    http://www.noaa.gov/features/02_monitoring/bioluminescence.html 

    2. How Stuffs Work - http://science.howstuffworks.com/environmental/life/zoology/all-about-animals/bioluminescence1.htm)
    — 1 week ago with 102 notes
    theselfieissue:

The flirty and fun actress, Zoey Deutch. #theselfieissue

    theselfieissue:

    The flirty and fun actress, Zoey Deutch. #theselfieissue

    — 1 week ago with 35 notes
    modelsofcolor:

Samantha Harris, Jessica Gomes, & Shanina Shaik on the cover of the Sydney Magazine, April 2013 issue photographed by Simon Upton.

    modelsofcolor:

    Samantha Harris, Jessica Gomes, & Shanina Shaik on the cover of the Sydney Magazine, April 2013 issue photographed by Simon Upton.

    — 1 week ago with 187 notes
    modelsofcolor:

Sports Illustrated Swimsuit 2014

    modelsofcolor:

    Sports Illustrated Swimsuit 2014

    — 1 week ago with 180 notes

    The Rio Caño Cristales - most colorful river (caused by algae and moss seen through the water), Colombia.

    (Source: weather.com, via embrace-audacity)

    — 1 week ago with 94595 notes